A simple, minimalistic and straight to the point man is the illustrator behind this exclusive interview on TheCornerZine. Simon Landrein’s attitude and approach to life and social networks is something we should all follow and remind ourselves of. Want to learn more about what Simon means? Then keep on reading!

An artist, an illustrator and an animator. Which do you feel suits the way you portray yourself? Who’s the real Simon?

For now, I’d say an illustrator.

Simon Landrein

A simple, minimalistic and straight to the point man is the illustrator behind this exclusive interview on TheCornerZine. Simon Landrein’s attitude and approach to life and social networks is something we should all follow and remind ourselves of. Want to learn more about what Simon means? Then keep on reading!

An artist, an illustrator and an animator. Which do you feel suits the way you portray yourself? Who’s the real Simon?

For now, I’d say an illustrator.

Simon Landrein

I’m French, but I lived in London for 10 years, so I guess both cultures have strong influences on my work. It’s funny though, because the French and British are very different and similar at the same time.

Everyone sees and has a different view of others and themselves. I’d like to know how you describe your aesthetic?

The style I’m using is quite bold, sometimes minimalistic and definitely cheeky.

With an enormous client list on your resume, has there been one that stands out from the crowd in your mind with special admiration?

Working with Le Monde was a great experience in the editorial field. I’ve also been featured in some great articles.

You’re based in France. Would you say this city has had a strong influence in your artworks? What about your time in London?

I’m French, but I lived in London for 10 years, so I guess both cultures have strong influences on my work. It’s funny though, because the French and British are very different and similar at the same time. Maybe you can see a bit of that in my work, but it’s hard for me to tell.

Was the life of an artist the one you dreamt of as a child? Did it seem like the natural path or did you envision something completely different?

Honestly, I had no idea I’d make a living out of my drawings, what I wanted growing was to have a job. At first I was just happy to work, but I’ve had a lot of luck throughout my career and the addition of a few opportunities has led me to what I do now.

Is there a particular artist you’ve admired since you were a little boy who’s inspired your artistic style and works?

No, not really. I think everyone admires different artists throughout their life, and the sum of their influences is hard to describe. That said, what’s interesting is how some of them end up influencing you more than others do, even if they’re not the ones you’ve been looking up to for years. So, maybe reading a lot of Belgian/French comics, such as the ones drawn by Hergé and Franquin, had a strong influence on my work.

How about now? Is that role model/artist still the same?

Now most of my role models are friends of mine, people I talk to directly. I think I get much more inspiration from day to day conversations. Also, because they can be quite funny to translate into illustrations. By the way, I’m much more a movie nerd than a design geek. So a big influence for me is cinema: I really dig Bertrand Blier, and a lot of American directors too (Robert Altman, Michael Mann, Martin and, more recently, Adam McKay).

Your work is featured in a lot of editorials, from magazines all over the world (such as The New Yorker, The New York Times and GQ France). Speaking particularly about magazines, what’s your favourite among the ones you read? Gearing towards more fashion-related ones, do you have a favourite magazine there?

One of my favourites is a French magazine about cinema that’s called ‘Rockyrama’. I don’t really have a fashion magazine in mind. I guess that I tend to just stick with a few things I know and follow them on their social platforms.

Briefly continuing with fashion-related questions, what’s your go-to outfit and what’s missing from your wardrobe?

My go-to outfit is clearly street-inspired. So, what’s probably missing from my wardrobe are be more slick, city guy clothes and accessories, like a blazer with a T-shirt underneath and a pair of Chelsea boots. That kind of things. People usually assume I’m younger than I am (Laughs, E.D.).

Recently, I was speaking with an acquaintance who’s an architect about the software technology and platforms she uses for creating her works. As a creative myself, who enjoys designing and sketching fashion, I’m curious about what software you use.

I’m using Photoshop and my Cintiq mostly, as it’s so useful. Although, my pens and paper are always next to my computer and I still draw the old school way when I have ten minutes to spare.

Do you prefer using softwares or drawing the old school way, with a pen and paper?

Actually, both.

Simon, I have to confess I spent over an hour scrolling through your Instagram profile (Laughs, E.D.). To say the least, I was beyond intrigued, addicted and exceptionally impressed. Your artworks are very comical and provocative, I love it! Speaking of your Instagram account, you seem to be a very active person on social networks. Tell me, what’s your thoughts on them? Which do you use most? And do you see it as a beneficial platform for you?

I’ve started using them more actively over the last three years. It’s been working for me? I think Instagram is a well-tailored application for illustrations, and because my style is fairly quite simple I can post a lot of content, which suits that platform perfectly. I’m well aware the meaning of a having a lot of likes might not exactly mean just that. As I said before, I think I’m a perfect fit for that tool, that’s all. It’s a free window through which you can sell your work online, so I’m using it in that sense.

Building off social networks and technology in general, nowadays, as a society we’re bombarded with an overflowing amount of images, and as an illustrator who creates images, do you feel like you have a duty to create a work of art that makes people think? Specifically, to enrich our minds to really start a conversation.

Not really, I don’t think I have any duty to make people think. I sure think it’s great if I can make a few people curious about what I do and open some conversations, but I guess it’s mostly about giving a point of view or telling a story that elicits feelings. That’s a good starting point.

Simon, I’d love to hear your personal advice for the next generations of creatives. By the way, don’t sugar coat it! (Laughs, E.D.)

Well I think one of the good things is to watch, read and listen to any art form you like. It’s always great to take the time to know more about things we do and look up to. I know it might sound cheesy, but going to a gallery instead of scrolling down your phone is obviously, as you’ll remember it much more and you might meet people there who’ll chat with you.

To conclude, imagine this...there are two travel tickets on the table and a carry-on bag on the ground. For where are the tickets to? Who’s is going with you, and minus your sketch pad and pen, what’re the essentials you’d take with you?

I’d love to have this in front of me! I love to travel, but I’m not really adventurous. Perhaps, a fun travel would be with my sister to Japan. As she’s just learned the language and I’ve never been there, so I’d have a personal translator with me. I’m not that lazy though, but it could be great. I’d undoubtedly take my earplugs with me, I live in a very quiet place now and I’m not use to noises anymore!

My go-to outfit is clearly street-inspired. So, what’s probably missing from my wardrobe are be more slick, city guy clothes and accessories, like a blazer with a T-shirt underneath and a pair of Chelsea boots.