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With a following of 50K on Instagram, Spanish-born artist Diego Cabezas is taking the internet by storm, thanks to his unique minimalistic approach to sculpture-making. Let’s now get to know Diego and find out what it means to be a sculptor in the 21st century!

First things first, what’s your earliest art-related memory?

Making puppets with egg boxes. I was only a child, and it felt very nice. Nobody told me or taught me to do it, I just felt the need to and I clearly remember the joy of doing it. In my family there wasn’t any artistic background, so it was just a spontaneous experience.

Diego Cabezas

With a following of 50K on Instagram, Spanish-born artist Diego Cabezas is taking the internet by storm, thanks to his unique minimalistic approach to sculpture-making. Let’s now get to know Diego and find out what it means to be a sculptor in the 21st century!

First things first, what’s your earliest art-related memory?

Making puppets with egg boxes. I was only a child, and it felt very nice. Nobody told me or taught me to do it, I just felt the need to and I clearly remember the joy of doing it. In my family there wasn’t any artistic background, so it was just a spontaneous experience.

Diego Cabezas

If you eliminate art from you life, you lose an important source of joy, inspiration and ‘meaning’.

Growing up, did you have a mentor, someone to guide and teach you the dynamics of the art industry?

Yes, I was lucky to be friends with painter Xaime Cabanas, who was 30 years older than me. When I was in my twenties, I tried to be an artist in a conservative city like A Coruña. Nobody took me seriously, except for Xaime. Even though he was a successful painter, he always treated me as an equal, which meant a lot to me. I used to visit Xaime and spend wonderful evenings together with him, talking about art and life. By the way, he was constantly smoking, while drawing and telling funny stories. He gave me a lot of good advice, and it was very important for me to see a true artist doing amazing things and using all kinds of materials, even coffee and sand from the beach. He passed away in 2013, and I still miss him deeply. Sometimes, I dream of sculpting together with Xaime, while talking about shapes, colours and life, the kind of conversations I find difficult to have with other people.

That being said, what’s behind your decision to focus on sculpture, instead of more contemporary art forms?

It was more of a natural choice than a decision. I’ve always felt the need to do things with my hands.

You studied art, in A Coruña, at Escuela de Arte y Superior de Diseño Pablo Picasso. As I can see a resemblance between Picasso’s work and your metal sculptures, I’d like to know more about his on-going influence on your approach to art-making.

Well, some of my pieces can resemble his artworks, but others…not at all! I have no boundaries when it comes to imagining and, if the results of my work remind people of one artist or another, there’s nothing I can do about it. That being said, Picasso has been a big influence on thousands of artists, it’s almost impossible not to have been influenced by him.

Diego, what’s the sculpture you’re most attached to? What makes it special?

I’m not attached to a particular sculpture, as my head is always focused on doing new things, making ideas that only exist on paper, or in my imagination, reality. Art is what brings meaning to my life, it’s an endless game!

These days, how are you staying inspired? Is there any profile you follow on Instagram for inspiration?

I’m always inspired. Even if I don’t want to be, my mind is constantly working on new ideas: it’s just a natural thing for me. The best way to get inspired, for me, is going for a quiet walk with my dog and looking at the sky and surrounding nature.

Let’s take a step back. What’s the project that put you to the test?

I don’t repeat pieces, so every sculpture is a new challenge. That’s the beauty of it, because it pushes me to do better or, at least, try to. By the way, there’s always some unexpected problem that makes the work process amusing after the fact.

With a following of more than 50K on Instagram, you’re one of today’s most liked sculptors. What’s your relationship with social networks? Do you think you’d have reached your goals without being on them?

Internet gave us all the opportunity of sharing our work with the whole world. I couldn’t make it without being on social networks, as they’re a very important tool in today’s world. What I like the most is the fact that they allow you to interact with people from all over the globe. That being said, on the internet there’s a pressure to do better all the time, to try and keep a good level of work and ideas, otherwise people can unfollow you very quickly!

Let’s now speak of your style. How can your go-to outfit be described? Is it as minimalistic as your iron sculptures?

I don’t know if I have a particular style, as I never thought about it. A plain or flower print T-shirt, a pair of jeans and shoes will do. It’s not special, but it’s comfortable.

Going off this, is fashion a field you’d like to collaborate with in the future?

Yes, of course. I collaborated with brands in the past, and these collaborations turned out to be very cool experiences. I always think about designing some clothes, but I’m too busy with sculptures at the moment. Anyhow, I hope that I’ll be able to do it someday...

As you live in Barcelona, the city of Gaudì, I’d like to know where you’d take us if you had to show us around.

Fundación Miró, for sure. It’s my favourite museum and the surrounding area is perfect if you want to go for a walk. The ‘El borne’ neighborhood is great as well, with beautiful old streets, good bars and restaurants, and the Picasso museum. I really love to walk and this city is a very good place for it.

Diego, what advice would you give your 15-year-old self?

You’re on the right track, hold on and keep working! It’s going to be hard…

By the way, I read you believe that we’re all artists and, among other things, art is what makes us human. So, do you have a piece of advice for those who’d like to awaken their artistic side?

If you eliminate art from you life, you lose an important source of joy, inspiration and ‘meaning’.

Lastly, what’s the question you’ve never been asked but always wanted to answer?

The second question you asked me, actually. Thank you, I was waiting for someone to ask me that!

If you eliminate art from you life, you lose an important source of joy, inspiration and ‘meaning’.

I always think about designing some clothes, but I’m too busy with sculptures at the moment.